Health Tips From The Professor How to Relieve Stress Naturally

Try A Mental Massage

Author: Julie Donnelly, LMT –The Pain Relief Expert

Editor: Dr. Steve Chaney

 Want to know how to relieve stress naturally?

Stress is rampant in the lives of many people, whether it be from work, homelife, or things we can’t control such as the weather or traffic.  And stress is a killer!  Even if it doesn’t kill, it sure makes life unpleasant.

This short article will explain an easy technique that will massage your stomach and other organs, enabling you to release stress from your body.

The first time you do this technique I suggest you lie down in bed, but afterward you can do it anyplace.  It’s especially good to do while you’re experiencing a stressful situation.

How to Relieve Stress Naturally Step by Step

how to relieve stress naturally ice meltingStart by breathing deeply at your normal pace, paying attention to the rise and fall of your abdomen and chest. Visualize tension like a block of ice that you are melting with the warmth of your breath.

Next, breathe in through your nose to the count of four.

Hold your breath to the count of five.

Slowly breath out through your mouth, to the count of six.

Do this several times and then return to breathing at a normal pace, but still filling and emptying your lungs fully.

While breathing, see the “ice” melting from your scalp all the way through your face, neck, lungs, heart and stomach.  “Feel” it flowing out through your fingertips.

how to relieve stress naturally mittensContinue by “feeling” the ice melting from your hips, legs and feet, flowing out through your feet.

Relax and visualize the tension melting and flowing out of your body.

Next, visualize soft fluffy blue mittens cradling your face, your throat, your lungs, heart and stomach. Visualize the mittens moving down and softly rubbing your arms, legs and feet.

Keep breathing slowly and deeply, relaxing into this comforting vision.

how to relieve stress naturally visualizeFinally, visualize pure, positive energy in the form of diamond dust, sparkling and flowing into your head, filling your body, and flowing out through your fingers and toes.

When you have the time, allow this to take as much time as you like. And when you are living your busy life, realize that you can do this entire relaxation meditation in 30 seconds. Just see it as waves of energy passing from your head to your feet.

This simple exercise is one that I’ve taught people for years, and it really works!  It’s like a mini-spa treatment for your mind and nerves.

 

Wishing you well,

 

Julie Donnelly

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

 

About The Author

julie donnellyJulie Donnelly is a Deep Muscle Massage Therapist with 20 years of experience specializing in the treatment of chronic joint pain and sports injuries. She has worked extensively with elite athletes and patients who have been unsuccessful at finding relief through the more conventional therapies.

She has been widely published, both on – and off – line, in magazines, newsletters, and newspapers around the country. She is also often chosen to speak at national conventions, medical schools, and health facilities nationwide.

Health Tips From The Professor How Much Carbohydrates Should We Eat?

Posted September 11, 2018 by Dr. Steve Chaney

The “Goldilocks Effect”

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

 

How much carbohydrates should we eat?

how much carbohydrates should we eatThe low-carb wars rage on. Low-carb enthusiasts claim that low-carb diets are healthy. Many health experts warn about the dangers of low-carb diets. Several studies have reported that low-carb diets increase risk of mortality (shorten lifespan).

However, two recent studies have come to the opposite conclusion. Those studies reported that high carbohydrate intake increased mortality, and low carbohydrate intake was associated with the lowest mortality.

One of those studies, called the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study was published just last year. It included data from 135,335 participants from 18 countries across 5 continents. That’s a very large study, and normally we expect very large studies to be accurate. The results from the PURE study had low-carb enthusiasts doing a victory lap and claiming it was time to rewrite nutritional guidelines to favor low-carb diets.

Whenever controversies like this arise, reputable scientists are motivated to take another look at the question. They understand that all studies have their weaknesses and biases. So, they look at previous studies very carefully and try to design a study that eliminates the weaknesses and biases of those studies. Their goal is to design a stronger study that reconciles the differences between the previous studies.

how much carbohydrates should we eat studySuch a study has just been published (SB Seidelmann et al, The Lancet, doi.org/10.1016/S2468-2667(18)30135-X ). This study resolves the conflicting data and finally answers the question: “How much carbohydrates should we be eating if we desire a long and healthy life?” The answer is “Enough.”

I call this “The Goldilocks Effect” You may remember “Goldilocks And The Three Bears.” One bed was too hard. One bed was too soft. But, one bed was “just right.” One bowl of porridge was too hot. One was two cold. But, one was “just right.”  According to this study, the same is true for carbohydrate intake. High carbohydrate intake is unhealthy. Low carbohydrate intake is unhealthy. But, moderate carbohydrate intake is “just right.”

How Was The Study Done?

This study was performed in two parts. This first part drew on data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. That study enrolled 15,428 men and women, aged 45-64, from four US communities between 1987 and 1989. This group was followed for an average of 25 years, during which time 6283 people died. Carbohydrate intake was calculated based on food frequency questionnaires administered when participants enrolled in the study and again 6 years later. The study evaluated the association between carbohydrate intake and mortality.

The second part was a meta-analysis that combined the data from the ARIC study with all major clinical studies since 2007 that measured carbohydrate intake and mortality and lasted 5 years or more. The total number of participants included in this meta-analysis was 432,179, and it included data from both studies that claimed low-carbohydrate intake was associated with decreased mortality.

 

How Much Carbohydrates Should We Eat?

 

how much carbohydrates should we eat ripThe results from the ARIC study were:

  • The relationship between mortality and carbohydrate intake was a U-shaped curve.
  • The lowest risk of death was observed with a moderate carbohydrate intake (50-55%). This is the intake recommended by current nutrition guidelines.
  • The highest risk of death was observed with a low carbohydrate intake (<40%).
  • The risk of death also increased with very high carbohydrate intake (>70%).
  • When the investigators used the mortality data to estimate life expectancy, they predicted a 50-year old participant would have a projected life expectancy of:
  • 1 years if they had a moderate intake of carbohydrates.
  • Their life expectancy was 4 years less if they had a low carbohydrate intake.
  • Their life expectancy was 1.1 year less if they had a very high carbohydrate intake.
  • The risk associated with low carbohydrate intake was affected by what the carbohydrate was replaced with.
  • When carbohydrate was replaced with animal protein and animal fat there was an increased risk of mortality on a low-carb diet. The animal-based low-carb diet contained more beef, pork, lamb, chicken and fish. It was also higher in saturated fat.
  • how much carbohydrates should we eat plantbasedWhen carbohydrate was replaced with plant protein and plant fats, there was a decreased risk of mortality on a low-carb diet. The plant-based low-carb diet contained more nuts, peanut butter, dark or whole grain breads, chocolate, and white bread. It was also higher in polyunsaturated fats.
  • The effect of carbohydrate intake on mortality was virtually the same for all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and non-cardiovascular mortality.
  • There was no significant affect of carbohydrate intake on long-term weight gain (another myth busted).

The results from the meta-analysis were very similar. When the data from all studies were combined:

  • Both low carbohydrate diets and very high carbohydrate diets were associated with increased mortality.
  • Meat-based low-carb diets increased mortality, and plant-based low-carb diets decreased mortality.
  • Once again, the results were the same for total mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and non-cardiovascular mortality.

The authors concluded: “Our findings suggest a negative long-term association between life-expectancy on both low carbohydrate and high carbohydrate diets…These data also provide further evidence that animal-based low carbohydrate diets should be discouraged. Alternatively, when restricting carbohydrate intake, replacement of carbohydrates with predominantly plant-based fats and proteins could be considered as a long-term approach to healthy aging.”

Why Were Some Previous Studies Misleading?

This study also resolved the discrepancies between previous studies. The authors pointed out that the average carbohydrate intake is very different in Europe and the US than in Asian countries and low-income countries. In the US and Europe, mean carbohydrate intake is about 50% of calories and it ranges from 25% to 70% of calories. With that range of carbohydrate intake, it is possible to observe the increase in mortality associated with both low and high carbohydrate intakes.

White rice is a staple in Asian countries, and protein is a garnish rather than a main course. Consequently, overall carbohydrate intake is greater in Asian countries and very few Asians eat a low carbohydrate diet. High protein foods tend to be more expensive than high carbohydrate foods. Thus, very few people in developing countries can afford to follow a low carbohydrate diet, and overall carbohydrate intake also tends to be higher.

how much carbohydrates should we eat aricTherefore, in Asian and developing countries the average carbohydrate intake is greater (~61%) than in the US and Europe, and the range of carbohydrate intake is from 45% to 80% of calories. With that range of intake, it is only possible to see the increase in mortality associated with high carbohydrate intake.

Both the studies that low-carb enthusiast quote to support their claim that low-carb diets are healthy relied heavily on data from Asian and developing countries. In fact, when the authors of the current study overlaid the data from the PURE study with their ARIC data, there was an almost perfect fit. The only difference was that their ARIC data covered both low and high carbohydrate intake while the PURE study touted by low-carb enthusiasts only covered moderate to high carbohydrate intake. [I have given you my rendition of the graph on the left. If you would like to see the data yourself, look at the paper .]

Basically, low-carb advocates are telling you that diets with carbohydrate intakes of 30% or less are healthy based on studies that did not include carbohydrate intakes below 40%. That is misleading. The studies they quote are incapable of detecting the risks of low carbohydrate diets.

What Does This Mean For You?

There are several important take-home lessons from this study:

  • All major studies agree that very high carbohydrate intake is unhealthy. In part, that reflects the fact that diets with high carbohydrate intake are likely to be high in sodas and sugary junk foods. It may also reflect the fact that diets which are high in carbohydrate are inevitably low in protein or healthy fats or both.
  • how much carbohydrates should we eat low-carbAll studies that cover the full range of carbohydrate intake agree that low carbohydrate intake is also unhealthy. It shortens life expectancy of a 50-year old by about 4 years.
  • The studies quoted by low carb enthusiasts to support their claim that low-carb diets are healthy don’t include carbohydrate intakes below 40%. That means their claims are misleading. The studies they quote are incapable of detecting the risks of low carbohydrate diets.
  • Meat-based low-carb diets decrease life expectancy while plant-based low carb diets increase life expectancy. This is consistent with previous studies. For more details on those studies, see my article “Are Any Low-Carb Diets Healthy?” in “Health Tips From The Professor” or my book, “Slaying The Food Myths.”

The health risks of meat-based low-carb diets may be due to the saturated fat content or the heavy reliance on red meat. However, the risks are just as likely to be due to the foods these diets leave out – typically fruits, whole grains, legumes, and some vegetables. Proponents of low-carb diets assume that you can make up for the missing nutrients by just taking a multivitamin. However, each food group also provides a unique combination of phytonutrients and fibers. The fibers, in turn, influence your microbiome. Simply put, whenever you leave out whole food groups, you put your health at risk.

Limitations Of This Study

how much carbohydrates should we eat limitationsMy main concern with this study and all previous studies is that they lump all carbohydrates together, as if they were equally healthy or unhealthy. We should really be focusing on healthy carbohydrates versus unhealthy carbohydrates, healthy proteins versus unhealthy proteins, and healthy fats versus unhealthy fats. We should be focusing on foods.

For example, the plant-based low carbohydrate diets in this study probably had a higher percentage of healthy carbohydrates because those diets feature whole, plant-based foods. The very high carbohydrate diets in this study probably had a higher percentage of unhealthy carbohydrates. However, we have no idea whether the diets with moderate carbohydrate intake featured healthy carbohydrates or unhealthy carbohydrates. That is critical because moderate carbohydrate intake was the baseline to which all other diets were compared.

An important unanswered question is: “What is the relationship between carbohydrate intake and lifespan when most of the carbohydrates come from whole, plant-based foods?” Is low carbohydrate intake healthier or less healthy than moderate carbohydrate intake? Is high carbohydrate intake still less healthy? We have no idea. No studies have analyzed the data in that way.

Similarly, we know from multiple studies that meat-based, low-carb diets increase mortality and plant-based, low-carb diets decrease mortality when compared to moderate carbohydrate intake with no differentiation of protein source. But, what if the moderate carbohydrate group had also been subdivided into meat eaters and plant eaters? Would meat-based, low-carb diets still be less healthy than meat-based, moderate-carbohydrate diets? Would plant-based,  low-carb diets still be healthier than plant-based, moderate-carb diets? We have no idea.

 

The Bottom Line

The low-carb wars are raging. Several studies have reported that low-carb diets increase risk of mortality (shorten lifespan). However, two recent studies have come to the opposite conclusion. Those studies have low-carb enthusiasts doing a victory lap and claiming it is time to rewrite nutritional guidelines to favor low-carb diets.

However, a study just published a couple of weeks ago resolves the conflicting data and finally answers the question: “How much carbohydrate should we be eating if we desire a long and healthy life?” The answer is “Enough.”

I call this “The Goldilocks Effect.”  According to this study, high carbohydrate intake is unhealthy. Low carbohydrate intake is unhealthy. But, moderate carbohydrate intake is “just right.”

Specifically, this study reported:

  • Moderate carbohydrate intake (50-55%) is healthiest. This is also the carbohydrate intake recommended by current nutritional guidelines.
  • All major studies agree that very high carbohydrate intake (60-70%) is unhealthy. It shortens life expectancy of a 50-year old by about a year.
  • All studies that cover the full range of carbohydrate intake agree that low carbohydrate intake (<40%) is also unhealthy. It shortens life expectancy of a 50-year old by about 4 years.
  • The studies quoted by low carb enthusiasts to support their claim that low-carb diets are healthy don’t include carbohydrate intakes below 40%. That means their claims are misleading. The studies they quote are incapable of detecting the risks of low carbohydrate diets.
  • Meat-based, low-carb diets decrease life expectancy while plant-based, low carb diets increase life expectancy. This is consistent with the results of previous studies.

The authors concluded: “Our findings suggest a negative long-term association between life-expectancy and both low carbohydrate and high carbohydrate diets…These data also provide further evidence that animal-based low carbohydrate diets should be discouraged. Alternatively, when restricting carbohydrate intake, replacement of carbohydrates with predominantly plant-based fats and proteins could be considered as a long-term approach to healthy aging.”

For more details, read the article above.

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Health Tips From The Professor Are ADHD Symptoms Reduced by Omega-3s?

Posted September 4, 2018 by Dr. Steve Chaney

Can Natural Approaches Cure ADHD?

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

 

adhd symptoms childrenYou keep seeing headlines saying that omega-3 fatty acids can help children with ADHD. But your pediatrician doesn’t recommend them. Why not? Is the story about omega-3s helping with ADHD symptoms just another myth created by supplement companies wanting to lighten your wallet? Or, is your doctor not keeping up with the latest scientific advances? As usual, the truth lies somewhere in between.

This week I will discuss the latest study (J.P-C. Chang et al, Neuropyschopharmacology, 43: 534-545, 2018) on omega-3s and ADHD symptoms. It provides an excellent update on the role of omega-3s in reducing ADHD symptoms.

 

How Was The Study Done?

adhd symptoms studyThe study was a meta-analysis. Meta-analyses combine the data from multiple studies. Their strength comes from the fact that they include data from subjects of different backgrounds and ethnicity. However, a meta-analysis can never be stronger than the studies it includes in its analysis. Simply put, if it combines data from poorly designed studies, it is no better than the weakest study.

The problem is that there have been a lot of poorly designed studies in this area of research. Some studies have included both children and adults. Others included subjects with psychiatric diagnoses other than ADHD. Still others combined omega-3 supplementation with other vitamins and nutrients. Finally, some used inadequate measures of ADHD symptoms and cognitive function. Because the design of previous studies has been so varied, the results have been conflicting. Some studies have found that omega-3 supplementation reduced ADHD symptoms. Others found no benefit.

Because of the confusion arising from poorly designed studies, the authors of this study applied very rigorous criteria in selecting the studies to be included in their meta-analysis. Their criteria were:

  • The studies were randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of mega-3 supplementation with DHA or EPA alone or in combination.
  • Participants were school-aged children (4-12 years) and adolescents (13-17 years) who had a diagnosis of ADHD.
  • The study measured clinical symptoms of ADHD as reported by parents. Some also included reports by teachers. When cognitive data were included, the studies relied on well-established cognitive tests.
  • The data allowed a calculation of effect size (this is a statistical requirement that simply says the quality of the data were good enough to reliably calculate the difference between the supplemented and control groups).
  • The publications were in peer reviewed journals.

They ended up with seven studies with a total of 534 subjects (318 received omega-3s and 216 received a placebo).

They also performed a separate metanalysis of studies that have measured omega-3 levels in school-aged children and adolescents who had been diagnosed with ADHD. The criteria for inclusion in this metanalysis were similarly rigorous. They ended up including nine studies totaling 558 subjects, 297 with ADHD and 261 controls in this meta-analysis.

 

Do Omega-3s Reduce ADHD Symptoms?

adhd symptoms omega-3sThe results from the first meta-analysis were:

  • Omega-3 supplementation significantly improved parental reports of total ADHD symptoms scores as well as scores of inattention and hyperactivity.
  • When the children were given cognitive performance tests, the omega-3 supplemented group performed better than the placebo group when tested for omission errors (for example, a number or word left out in a memory test) and commission errors (an incorrect number or word in a memory test).
  • A dose of EPA + DHA of 500 mg/day or greater appeared to be optimal.

The results from the second meta-analysis were:

  • Children and adolescents with ADHD had significantly lower levels of DHA, EPA, and total omega-3s in their red blood cells (a good measure of omega-3 status) than controls.

The authors concluded: “In summary, there is evidence that omega-3 supplementation improves clinical symptoms and cognitive performances in children and adolescents with ADHD, and that these youth have a deficiency of omega-3 levels. Our findings provide further support to the rationale for using omega-3s as a treatment option for ADHD.”

The authors went on to say: “In the context of ‘personalized medicine,’ it is tempting to speculate that a subpopulation of youth with ADHD and low levels of omega-3s may respond better to omega-3 supplementation, but there are no studies to date attempting this stratification approach [looking at the effect of omega-3 supplementation in the subpopulation with both ADHD and omega-3 deficiency]…Therefore, stratification of ADHD children by omega-3 levels…could be one approach to optimize the therapeutic effects of omega-3 supplementation.”

Basically, they are suggesting that the benefits of omega-3 supplementation are likely to be greatest for those children with ADHD who are also omega-3 deficient. They are also saying that future studies should measure omega-3 status before and after supplementation so that the true benefit of omega-3 supplementation can be determined. I agree

 

What Does This Mean For You?

adhd symptoms youthThis study was very well done. By including only the best designed studies in their meta-analysis, the authors have provided good evidence that omega-3s can be of benefit in reducing ADHD symptoms. The authors also pointed out that low-dose omega-3 supplementation is virtually free of side effects. Thus, this is an option that should be tried first, before considering medications to control ADHD symptoms.

On the other hand, I wouldn’t expect miracles. This was not a huge effect. Not all the ADHD symptoms improved with omega-3 supplementation. Teacher’s reports did not show the same benefits as parent’s reports.

There are two ways to interpret the limitations of omega-3 benefits seen in this meta-analysis.

  • Clinical studies report the average results for all the children in the study. Your child may not be average. If your child doesn’t like fish, especially the oil, cold-water fish that are rich in omega-3s, they may experience a greater benefit from omega-3 supplementation.
  • The benefit of omega-3s seen in this meta-analysis is just one facet of a holistic, natural approach for controlling ADHD without drugs. One of the best reviews on natural approaches for controlling ADHD was written by two pediatricians with years of experience dealing with ADHD. I wrote about their review in a previous issue, adhd diet vs medication, of “Health Tips From the Professor”. You should check it out. There was a lot of wisdom in their advice.

 

The Bottom Line

 

  • A recent meta-analysis has reported that omega-3 supplementation improves clinical symptoms and cognitive performances in children and adolescents with ADHD.
  • The optimal dose appeared to be 500 mg/day or above.
  • The authors also reported that children with ADHD were more likely to be omega-3 deficient than children without ADHD and suggested that omega-3 supplementation is most likely to be effective for those children who are omega-3 deficient.
  • The authors also pointed out that low-dose omega-3 supplementation had negligible side-effects, so it should be tried before the child is put on medication.
  • Omega-3s are just one facet of a holistic, natural approach for reducing ADHD symptoms.

For more details, read the article above.

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Health Tips From The Professor Red Meat and Heart Health

Posted August 28, 2018 by Dr. Steve Chaney

Can Red Meat Be Part Of A Heart Healthy Diet?

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

 

What about red meat and heart health?

red meat and heart health studyIt is so confusing. One recent headline proclaimed “Plant-based foods decrease the risk of heart disease and cancer.”  Another headline read: “Including beef with the Mediterranean diet improves heart health.”  You are probably wondering which of these studies is correct. More importantly, you are probably wondering whether you should include more meat or less meat in your diet.

If you read the articles, you will find that the dueling headlines are deceptive. Both studies reached essentially the same conclusion. The first study (K.S. Petersen et al, Current Developments in Nutrition, 2017; 1:e001289 ) concluded that plant-based diets significantly decreased the risk of heart disease and diabetes. It also concluded that you can include small amounts of animal protein in a plant-based diet without losing its health benefits. The second study (L.E. O’Connor et al, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 108: 1-8, 2018 ) concluded that the Mediterranean diet, which is a primarily plant-based diet, significantly decreased the risk of heart disease and diabetes. It also concluded that you could include small amounts of lean, unprocessed red meat in the Mediterranean diet without losing its health benefits.

You might be wondering how it is possible to go from a study showing that small amounts of lean, unprocessed red meat did not reduce the heart-health benefits of the Mediterranean diet to a headline claiming: “Including Beef With A Mediterranean Diet Improves Heart Health.”  Did I mention that the study was funded by money from the beef industry and the headlines came from an online issue of Beef Magazine? That might explain it.

Let’s look at:

  • How the studies were designed.
  • The study results in detail.
  • What these studies mean for you.

 

How Were The Studies Done?

red meat heart health and heart diseaseStudy #1: The first study (K.S. Petersen et al, Current Developments in Nutrition, 2017; 1:e001289 ) was a systematic review of over 50 recent studies looking at the relative contribution of plant-based foods and animal products to healthy dietary patterns.

Study #2: The second study (L.E. O’Connor et al, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 108: 1-8, 2018 ) was, in the words of the authors, an investigator-blinded, randomized, crossover, controlled feeding trial. That is probably Greek to most of you, so let me explain.

  • A “controlled feeding study” is one in which subjects are given diets designed by dietitians to contain precise amounts of macronutrients and micronutrients. In this case, both diets were Mediterranean diets. One of the diets was the standard Mediterranean diet with 1 ounce/day of lean, processed red meat. This diet was referred to as Med-Control. The other diet was a version of the Mediterranean diet containing 2.47 ounces/day of red meat. It was referred to as Med-Red. (More about the design of these diets below). The diets were prepared for the subjects by the Indiana Clinical Research Center Bionutrition Facility at Purdue University. The subjects completed weekly menu check-off lists and met with staff weekly to monitor compliance.
  • A “crossover study” is one in which subjects are given one experimental diet, followed by a “washout period” when they consume their normal diet, followed by the second experimental diet. In this case both experimental diets were followed for 5 weeks and the washout period was 4 weeks. In this type of study each subject serves as their own control.
  • The term “randomized” simply means that some subjects consumed the Med-Control diet first and others consumed the Med-Red diet first.
  • The term “investigator-blinded” simply means the investigators did not know the order of the experimental diets each subject received. It is, of course, impossible to conduct a double-blind study when you are conducting a dietary intervention study, such as this one. The subjects know which diet they are consuming.

Other important features of the study were:

  • The study included 41 middle-aged (46±2 years), obese (BMI=30.5±0.6) adults from West Lafayette, Indiana.
  • Fasting blood samples were taken at entry into the study and during the last week of both experimental diets and the washout period. The investigators measured total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, ApoB, C-reactive protein, insulin, and blood glucose levels.
  • Blood pressure was also measured at the same times.

In interpreting the results of this study, it is important to know other features of the experimental diets. They are:

  • red meat heart health foodsOverall macronutrient composition was identical for the two diets. It was 40% carbohydrate, 22% protein, and 40% fat. In other words, it was nether low-carb nor low-fat. Instead it consisted of healthy carbs and healthy fats.
  • The differences between the two diets was almost entirely based on the relative amount of red meat and poultry in the diets. The Med-Control had more poultry and less red meat. The Med-Red had more red meat and less poultry.
  • The red meat was lean beef or pork tenderloin. The poultry was chicken or turkey breast (white meat with the skin removed prior to cooking). All meats were low in fat and cholesterol (˂10% total fat, ˂5% saturated fat, ˂95 mg cholesterol). In short, none of the subjects were eating juicy steaks and burgers or fried chicken.
  • Fish intake was the same on both diets (22% of protein intake) so that omega-3 intake was similar.
  • Nuts, seeds, and legumes (primarily soy) were the same on both diets (40% of protein intake). When you include grains and other plant protein sources, plant-based protein probably constituted almost 50% of total protein intake.
  • Both diets included the same amount of olive oil. The overall fat profile of the diet (7% saturated, 20% monounsaturated, and 13% polyunsaturated) was very healthy.
  • Both diets were rich in fruits and vegetables (4 servings/day of fruit and 7-8 servings/day of vegetables). This is much more than you would find in the typical American diet.
  • Both diets were composed primarily of whole grains. There was almost no sugar or refined grain in either diet. Again, this is very different from what most Americans eat.

 

Red Meat and Heart Health?

 

red meat and heart health dietsStudy #1: While the authors of this paper reviewed a variety of studies, I will focus on studies looking at the inclusion of red meat into otherwise healthy diets. For example, the authors reported on a recently published study looking at inclusion of 3 different levels (1 ounce/day, 4 ounces/day, and 5 ounces/day) of lean, red meat into the DASH diet, a diet specifically designed to reduce the risk of high blood pressure. That study showed:

  • Inclusion of up to 5 ounces/day of lean red meat did not reduce the effectiveness of the DASH diet at reducing heart disease risk factors. In fact, total and LDL cholesterol levels were slightly better than when red meat was limited to 1 ounce/day.
  • However, the authors noted that:
    • The DASH diet is already fairly high in animal protein. The increase in red meat consumption was achieved by replacing other animal protein sources in the diet.
    • These were very lean cuts of red meat. All 3 versions of the DASH diet were designed to limit saturated fat intake to ˂6% of total calories.
    • Plant protein was about 50% of total protein intake in all 3 diets.
    • All 3 diets eliminated “empty calorie” foods and provided lots of fruits and vegetables (8-10 servings/day).
    • All 3 diets included 4-5 cups of low fat dairy products.
  • The authors also noted that dietary intake was closely controlled in this study and that similar results might be difficult to achieve in a free-living setting. For example, they pointed out that previous studies have shown:
    • Higher meat consumption in the American population is associated with lower consumption of fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, seeds and soy products.

The authors concluded: “It is likely that consumption of animal products (excluding processed meats) at recommended amounts in the context of a dietary pattern that meets recommendations for fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, seeds, and legumes, and does not exceed recommendations for added sugar, sodium, and saturated fat, may not adversely affect, and may benefit cardiometabolic risk [risk of heart disease and diabetes].”

The authors went on to say: “However, population adherence to these recommendations is markedly suboptimal. Therefore, improving intake patterns to align with dietary guidelines should be the focus of our efforts rather than engaging in debate about whether diets for cardiovascular disease prevention should be exclusively plant-based or include animal foods in recommended amounts.”

In case you think that was clear as mud, let me offer my translation: “Lean, unprocessed meat consumption does not increase the risk of heart disease or diabetes when consumed as part of an extremely healthy diet. However, the American diet is lousy. We should focus on eating a healthy diet rather than arguing about whether it should be completely plant-based or can include some meat.”

Study #2: This study found that:

  • red meat heart health vegetables fruitsTotal and LDL cholesterol decreased more with Med-Red Meat than with Med-Control. However, the authors noted that the Mediterranean diet has little effect on total and LDL cholesterol levels, so its effect on reducing heart disease risk must be due to other factors.
  • The other parameters (HDL cholesterol, ApoB, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, insulin and blood glucose levels) were essentially the same on the Med-Red and Med-Control diets. However, the Med-Control diet also had little effect on these parameters compared to the normal diet of the subjects in the study. That probably reflected the short duration (5 weeks) of the diet intervention phase. Much longer dietary interventions would be required to adequately assess the effectiveness of either the Mediterranean diet or the Mediterranean diet with red meat at reducing disease risk.
  • Once again, the Med-Red diet was a carefully controlled diet that featured:
    • Small amounts (2.5 ounces/day) of very lean (<10% fat, <5% saturated fat) red meat in place of very lean poultry with about 50% of the protein in the diet coming from plant sources.
    • Lots of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, seeds, legumes, omega-3-rich seafood, and olive oil.
    • Almost no sugar and refined carbs.
    • A very healthy fat profile (7% saturated, 20% monounsaturated, and 13% polyunsaturated fat).
  • In short, this diet was radically different from the typical American diet.

The authors concluded: “Adults who are overweight or obese can consume 2.5 ounces/day as lean and unprocessed beef and pork when adopting a Mediterranean Pattern to improve cardiometabolic disease [heart disease and diabetes] risk factors.”

The authors went on to say: “Our results support previous observational and experimental evidence which shows that unprocessed and/or lean red meat consumption does not increase the risk of developing cardiovascular [heart] disease…”

As discussed below, the second conclusion is not supported by the data. We need to remember that this study was funded by money from the beef industry.

What Does This Mean For You?

red meat heart health lean meatsThe beef industry and low carb enthusiasts are telling you that red meat consumption as part of a healthy diet is good for your heart. These claims are very misleading. That’s because most Americans assume that their diet is already healthy. In addition, some Americans are being misled into believing that low carb diets are healthy (As I document in my book, “Slaying The Food Myths” those claims are currently unproven). Finally, many Americans interpret these claims as telling them that the juicy steaks, burgers, and sausages they love are heart healthy. The reality is far different.

  • The studies the claims are based on looked at red meat consumption in the context of the heart healthy DASH and Mediterranean diets, not in the context of the typical American diet or low carb diets.
  • The only risk factors affected in most of the studies are total and LDL cholesterol, which have low reliability of predicting heart disease risk by themselves. Furthermore, they appear to have almost no effect on the heart healthy benefits of the Mediterranean diet. In addition, the studies have been too short (typically 5 weeks) to reliably assess the effect of red meat on other heart disease risk factors.
  • The effect of red meat on heart disease risk factors has been assessed in carefully controlled diets that feature:
    • Small amounts of very lean (<10% fat, <6% saturated fat), unprocessed red meat in place of very lean poultry with about 50% of the protein in the diet coming from plant sources.
    • Lots of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, seeds, legumes, omega-3-rich seafood, and vegetable oils.
    • Almost no sugar and refined carbs.
    • A very healthy fat profile (7% saturated, 20% monounsaturated, and 13% polyunsaturated fat).

The authors of one recent review accurately concluded: “It is likely that consumption of animal products (excluding processed meats) at recommended amounts in the context of a dietary pattern that meets recommendations for fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, seeds, and legumes, and does not exceed recommendations for added sugar, sodium, and saturated fat, may not adversely affect, and may benefit cardiometabolic risk [risk of heart disease and diabetes]”.

How you extrapolate from that kind of conclusion to an unqualified claim that “Observational and experimental evidence shows that unprocessed and/or lean red meat consumption does not increase the risk of developing cardiovascular [heart] disease” is beyond me.

My summary would be: “Small amounts of lean, unprocessed meat do not appear to increase the risk of heart disease or diabetes when consumed as part of an extremely healthy plant-based diet. However, the American diet is lousy. Low carb diets leave out too many healthy foods. We should focus on eating a healthy diet [as defined above] rather than arguing about whether it should be low carb, low fat, completely plant-based or can include small amounts of lean, unprocessed meat.”

 

The Bottom Line

 

The beef industry and low carb enthusiasts are telling you that red meat consumption as part of a healthy diet is good for your heart. These claims are very misleading. That’s because most Americans assume that their diet is already healthy. In addition, some Americans are being misled into believing that low carb diets are healthy (As I document in my book, “Slaying The Food Myths” those claims are currently unproven). Finally, many Americans interpret these claims as telling them that the juicy steaks, burgers, and sausages they love are heart healthy. The reality is far different.

  • The studies the claims are based on looked at red meat consumption in the context of the heart healthy DASH and Mediterranean diets, not in the context of the typical American diet or low carb diets.
  • The only risk factors affected in most of the studies are total and LDL cholesterol, which have low reliability of predicting heart disease risk by themselves. In addition, they appear to have almost no effect on the heart healthy benefits of the Mediterranean diet. The studies have been too short (typically 5 weeks) to reliably assess the effect of red meat on other heart disease risk factors.
  • The effect of red meat on heart disease risk has been assessed in carefully controlled diets that feature:
    • Small amounts of very lean (<10% fat, <6% saturated fat), unprocessed red meat in place of very lean poultry with about 50% of the protein in the diet coming from plant sources.
    • Lots of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, seeds, legumes, omega-3-rich seafood, and vegetable oils.
    • Almost no sugar and refined carbs.
    • A very healthy fat profile (7% saturated, 20% monounsaturated, and 13% polyunsaturated fat).

The authors of one recent review accurately concluded: “It is likely that consumption of animal products (excluding processed meats) at recommended amounts in the context of a dietary pattern that meets recommendations for fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, seeds, and legumes, and does not exceed recommendations for added sugar, sodium, and saturated fat, may not adversely affect, and may benefit cardiometabolic risk [risk of heart disease and diabetes].”

How you extrapolate from that kind of conclusion to an unqualified claim that “Observational and experimental evidence shows that unprocessed and/or lean red meat consumption does not increase the risk of developing cardiovascular [heart] disease” is beyond me.

My summary would be: “Small amounts of lean, unprocessed meat do not appear to increase the risk of heart disease or diabetes when consumed as part of an extremely healthy plant-based diet. However, the American diet is lousy. Low carb diets leave out too many healthy foods. We should focus on eating a healthy diet [as defined above] rather than arguing about whether it should be low carb, low fat, completely plant-based or can include small amounts of lean, unprocessed meat.”

For more details, read the article above.

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Health Tips From The Professor Do Stretches For Sciatica Nerve Pain Work?

Sciatica Treatment

Author: Julie Donnelly, LMT –The Pain Relief Expert

Editor: Dr. Steve Chaney

 

Stretches for sciatica nerve pain work,
but only when muscle spasms are released first!

stretches for sciatica nerve pain tree exampleMost people have been told to stretch tight muscles, but they haven’t been told that muscle spasms (trigger points) shorten the fibers and tie the muscles into tiny micro knots.

Here is an analogy that helps explain how muscle spasms cause pain.

Consider what happens if you have two trees, a big strong one and one that easily moves.  Tie a rope straight across from tree to tree.  If you pull on the rope it’s easy to see that the flexible tree bends.

stretches for sciatica nerve pain tree leanHowever, if you tie several knots in the rope the flexible tree leans over toward the strong tree.  Now if you try to stretch the rope to make the flexible tree stand up straight the knots put a strain on the points where the rope is tied.

Trying to stretch the rope causes the knots to tighten and overstretches the rope on either side of the knot.

This is what happens with your muscles.

In the case of sciatica, the muscle that crosses over your sciatic nerve is the piriformis.  When the piriformis is shortened by a muscle spasm, it places a downward pressure on the sciatic nerve, impinging the nerve.  This gets complicated because other muscles cause your pelvis to rotate and press the bone up into your sciatic nerve.

If you try to stretch the piriformis muscle, it causes the tight muscle to press down onto the sciatic nerve and can potentially tear the muscle.

 

 Release the Muscle Knots Before Beginning Stretches for Sciatica Nerve Pain

stretches for sciatica nerve pain reliefBefore stretching, it’s easy and essential to release the muscle that causes sciatica pain.

Lie on the floor, place the Trigger Point Therapy Ball or a new tennis ball onto the piriformis muscles (pictured left).

Ease onto the ball until it doesn’t hurt.  Then move the ball just a bit to search for other tender points.  Hold 30-60 seconds on each tender point to release the muscle knots.

 

Stretches for Sciatica Nerve Pain Can Now Commence Safely !

stretches for sciatica nerve painThis seated spinal twist is a great stretch for sciatica.

Make sure you are seated tall and exhale as you twist.  Hold for a minute and switch sides.

 

 

 

Wishing you well,

Julie Donnelly

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

About The Author

julie donnellyJulie Donnelly is a Deep Muscle Massage Therapist with 20 years of experience specializing in the treatment of chronic joint pain and sports injuries. She has worked extensively with elite athletes and patients who have been unsuccessful at finding relief through the more conventional therapies.

She has been widely published, both on – and off – line, in magazines, newsletters, and newspapers around the country. She is also often chosen to speak at national conventions, medical schools, and health facilities nationwide.

Health Tips From The Professor Do Omega-3s Lower Blood Pressure in Young, Healthy Adults?

Posted August 14, 2018 by Dr. Steve Chaney

What Is The Omega-3 Index And Why Is It Important?

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

 

Do omega-3s lower blood pressure in healthy adults?

omega-3s lower blood pressure young adultsThe literature on the potential health benefits of omega-3s is very confusing. That’s because a lot of bad studies have been published. Many of them never determined the omega-3 status of their subjects prior to omega-3 supplementation. Others relied on dietary recalls of fish consumption, which can be inaccurate.

Fortunately, a much more accurate measure of omega-3 status has been developed and validated in recent years. It’s called the Omega-3 Index. Simply put, the Omega-3 Index is the percentage of EPA and DHA compared to 26 other fatty acids found in cellular membranes. Using modern technology, it can be determined from a single finger prick blood sample. It is a very accurate reflection of omega-3 intake relative to other fats in the diet over the past few months. More importantly, it is a measure of the omega-3 content of your cell membranes, which is a direct measure of your omega-3 nutritional status.

A recent extension of the Framingham Heart Study reported that participants with an Omega-3 Index >6.8% had a 39% lower risk of cardiovascular disease than those with an Omega-3 Index <4.2% (WS Harris et al, Journal of Clinical Lipidology, 12: 718-724, 2018 ). Although more work needs to be done, an Omega-3 Index of 4% or less is generally considered indicative of high cardiovascular risk, while 8% or better is considered indicative of low cardiovascular risk. For reference, the average American has an Omega-3 Index in the 4-5% range. In Japan, where fish consumption is much higher and cardiovascular risk much lower, the Omega-3 Index is in the 9-11% range.

Previous studies have suggested that omega-3 fatty acids lower blood pressure to a modest extent. Thus, it is not surprising that more recent studies have shown an inverse correlation between Omega-3 Index and blood pressure. However, those studies have been done with older populations, many of whom had already developed high blood pressure.

From a public health point of view, it is much more interesting to investigate whether it might be possible to prevent high blood pressure in older adults by optimizing omega-3 intake in a young, healthy population, most of whom had not yet developed high blood pressure. Unfortunately, there were no studies looking at that population. The current study was designed to fill that gap.

 

How Was The Study Done?

omega-3s lower blood pressure young healthy adultsThe current study (M.G. Filipovic et al, Journal of Hypertension, 36: 1548-1554, 2018 ) was based on data collected from 2036 healthy adults, aged 25-41, from Liechtenstein. They were participants in the GAPP (Genetic and Phenotypic Determinants of Blood Pressure) study. Participants were excluded from the study if they had been diagnosed with high blood pressure and were taking medication to lower their blood pressure. They were also excluded if they had heart disease, chronic kidney disease, other severe illnesses, obesity, sleep apnea, or daily use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications.

Blood samples were collected at the time of their enrollment in the study and frozen for subsequent determination of Omega-3 Index. Blood pressure was also measured at their time of enrollment in two different ways. The first was a standard blood pressure measurement in a doctor’s office.

For the second measurement they were given a wearable blood pressure monitor that recorded their blood pressure over 24 hours every 15 minutes during the day and every 30 minutes while they were sleeping. This is considered more accurate than a resting blood pressure measurement in a doctor’s office because it records the variation in blood pressure, while you are sleeping, while you are exercising, and while you go about your everyday activities.

 

Do Omega-3s Lower Blood Pressure In Young, Healthy Adults?

omega-3s lower blood pressure young adults equipmentNone of the participants in the study had significantly elevated blood pressure. The mean systolic and diastolic office blood pressures were 120±13 and 78±9 respectively. The average Omega-3 Index in this population was 4.6%, which is similar to the average Omega-3 Index in the United States.

When they compared the group with the highest Omega-3 Index (average = 5.8%) with the group with the lowest Omega-3 Index (average = 4.6%):

  • The office measurement of systolic and diastolic blood pressure was decreased by 3.3% and 2.6% respectively
  • While those numbers appear small, the differences were highly significant.
  • The 24-hour blood pressure measurements showed a similar decrease.
  • Blood pressure measurements decreased linearly with increasing Omega-3 Index. [In studies of this kind, a linear dose-response is considered an internal validation of the differences observed between the group with the highest Omega-3 Index and the group with the lowest Omega-3 Index.]

The authors concluded: “A higher Omega-3 Index is associated with statistically significant, clinically relevant, lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure in normotensive, young and healthy individuals. Diets rich omega-3 fatty acids may be a strategy for primary prevention of hypertension.”

 

What Does This Mean For You?

omega-3s lower blood pressure young adults questionPerhaps I should first comment on the significance of the relatively small decrease in blood pressure observed in this study.

  • These were young adults, all of whom had normal or near normal blood pressure.
  • The difference in Omega-3 Index was rather small (5.8% to 4.6%). None of the participants in the study were at the 8% or above that is considered optimal.
  • Liechtenstein is a small country located between Switzerland and Spain. Fish consumption is low and omega-3 supplement consumption is rare.

Under these conditions, even a small, but statistically significant, decrease in blood pressure is remarkable.

We should think of this study as the start of the investigation of the relationship between omega-3 status and blood pressure. Its weakness is that it only shows an association between high Omega-3 Index and low blood pressure. It does not prove cause and effect.

Its strength is that it is consistent with many other studies showing omega-3 fatty acids lower blood pressure. Furthermore, it suggests that the effect of omega-3s on blood pressure may also be seen in young, healthy adults who have not yet developed high blood pressure.

Finally, the authors suggested that a diet rich in omega-3s might reduce the incidence of high blood pressure by slowing the age-related increase in blood pressure that most Americans experience. This idea is logical, but speculative at present.

However, the GAPP study is designed to provide the answer to that question. It is a long-term study with follow-up examinations scheduled every 3-5 years. It will be interesting to see whether the author’s prediction holds true, and a higher Omega-3 Index is associated with a slower increase in blood pressure as the participants age.

 

Why Is The Omega-3 Index Important?

 

The authors of this study said: “The Omega-3 Index is very robust to short-term intake of omega-3 fatty acids and reliably reflects an individual’s long-term omega-3 status and tissue omega-3 content. Therefore, the Omega-3 Index has the potential to become a cardiovascular risk factor as much as the HbA1c is for people with diabetes…” That is a bit of an overstatement. HbA1c is a measure of disease progression for diabetes because it is a direct measure of blood sugar control.

In contrast, Omega-3 Index is merely a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, if it is further validated by future studies, it is likely to be as important for predicting cardiovascular risk as are cholesterol levels and markers of inflammation.

However, to me the most important role of Omega-3 Index is in the design of future clinical studies. If anyone really wants to determine whether omega-3 supplementation reduces cardiovascular risk, high blood pressure, diabetes or any other health outcome they should:

  • Start with a population group with an Omega-3 Index in the deficient (4-5%) range.
  • Supplement with omega-3 fatty acids in a double blind, placebo-controlled manner.
  • Show that supplementation brought participants up to an optimal Omega-3 Index of 8% or greater.
  • Look at health outcomes such as heart attacks, cardiovascular deaths, hypertension, stroke, or depression.
  • Continue the study long enough for the beneficial effects of omega-3 supplementation to be measurable. For cardiovascular outcomes the American Heart Association has stated that at least two years are required to obtain meaningful results.

These are the kind of experiments that will be required to give definitive, reproducible results and resolve the confusion about the health effects of omega-3 fatty acids.

 

The Bottom Line

 

An accurate measure of omega-3 status has been developed and validated in recent years. It’s called the Omega-3 Index. Simply put, the Omega-3 Index is the percentage of EPA and DHA compared to 26 other fatty acids found in cellular membranes.

Although more work needs to be done, an Omega-3 Index of 4% or less is generally considered indicative of high cardiovascular risk while 8% or better is considered indicative of low cardiovascular risk.

Previous studies have shown an inverse correlation between Omega-3 Index and blood pressure. However, these studies have been done with older populations, many of whom had already developed high blood pressure.

From a public health point of view, it is much more interesting to investigate whether it might be possible to prevent high blood pressure in older adults by optimizing omega-3 intake in a young, healthy population, most of whom had not yet developed high blood pressure. Until now, there have been no studies looking at that population.

The study described in this article was designed to fill that gap. The participants in this study were ages 25-41, were healthy, and none of them had elevated blood pressure.

When the group with the highest Omega-3 Index (average = 5.8%) was compared with the group with the lowest Omega-3 Index (average = 4.6%):

  • Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure were decreased
  • Blood pressure measurements decreased linearly with increasing Omega-3 Index.

The authors concluded: “A higher Omega-3 Index is associated with statistically significant, clinically relevant, lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure in normotensive, young and healthy individuals. Diets rich omega-3 fatty acids may be a strategy for primary prevention of hypertension.”

Let me translate that last sentence into plain English for you. The authors were saying that optimizing omega-3 intake in young adults may slow the age-related increase in blood pressure and reduce the risk of them developing high blood pressure as they age. This may begin to answer the question “Do omega-3s lower blood pressure in young, healthy adults?”

Or even more simply put: Aging is inevitable. Becoming unhealthy is not.

For more details, read the article above.

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Health Tips From The Professor Does Vitamin D Reduce Cholesterol In Children?

 

Posted August 7, 2018 by Dr. Steve Chaney

Is Vitamin D Associated With Heart Disease Risk?

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

vitamin-d-reduce-cholesterol-childrenNot too many years ago, we thought of vitamin D as affecting bone density and little else. Then we discovered that almost every cell in our body has vitamin D receptors. This has lead to research suggesting that vitamin D affects our health in many ways that were unimaginable only a couple of decades ago.

For example, low vitamin D levels are associated with increased risk of heart disease. The linkage between vitamin D and heart disease has not been proven. Nor do we know the mechanism. However, this has lead to ongoing research asking if there is any relationship between vitamin D and cholesterol metabolism.

The answer appears to be yes. Several studies have suggested a correlation between low vitamin D levels and elevated total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides – all risk factors for heart disease.

The next question is how early in life is this correlation found. Again, some studies have suggested that the same correlation between low vitamin D and high levels of unhealthy lipids are found in teens. But, what about pre-teens, children who haven’t gone through puberty yet? That’s what this study was designed to determine.

How Was The Study Done?

vitamin-d-reduce-cholesterol-children studyThe current study  was based on data collected from 419 children, ages 6-8, in the Physical Activity and Nutrition in Children (PANIC) Study in Eastern Finland. This was a lifestyle study that collected information on body weight, diet, and activity levels.

Fasting blood samples were also collected and analyzed for blood lipid levels (total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides) and for 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), which is considered the most accurate measure of vitamin D status. The National Institutes of Health considers:

  • <30 nmol/L of 25(OH)D an indicator of vitamin D deficiency.
  • 30 to <50 nmol/L 25(OH)D an indicator of vitamin D insufficiency.
  • ≥50 nmol/L 25(OH)D an indicator of adequate vitamin D status.

To put this study in perspective, vitamin D status is a major concern in Finland because of its proximity to the Arctic Circle. There is little sunlight in the winter, and, although the days are long in the summer, the sun is weak. The major sources of vitamin D in the Finnish diet are fish, vitamin D-fortified fluid milk products, vitamin D-fortified fat spreads, and vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin D fortification was introduced in Finland in 2003. Vitamin D supplementation has also become increasing popular. The number of people using vitamin D supplements has increased from 11% in 2000 to 41% in 2011.

A recent study  looking a vitamin D status between 2000 and 2011 found that the combination of food fortification and vitamin D supplementation has been successful at improving vitamin D status in the Finnish population, increasing average 25(OH)D levels from 48 nmol/L to 65 nmol/L.

 

Does Vitamin D Reduce Cholesterol In Children?

vitamin dIn this study the mean serum 25(OH)D in the children was 68.1 nmol/L. 20% of the children had serum 25(OH)D below 50 nmol/L, and only 4 children (1%) had serum 25(OH)D below 30 nmol/L. When 25(OH)D levels were compared with blood lipid levels:

  • Higher serum 25(OH)D levels Forskolin Keto Complete were associated with lower plasma levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides.
  • The association between higher 25(OH)D levels and lower blood levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol remained after correcting for weight, physical activity, sedentary behavior, diet, daylight time, parental education, and genetic mutations known to affect vitamin D metabolism.

What Does This Mean For You?

I don’t want to overinterpret the study. Not all studies show an inverse association between 25(OH)D and cholesterol levels. Most of the previous studies have also indicated that higher 25(OH)D levels were associated increased HDL levels, while this study found higher 25(OH)D levels associated with decreased HDL levels. Much more research needs to be done.

However, this study is yet another indication that optimal vitamin D status may be important for heart health, even in young children. While the correlation between vitamin D status and heart health is not definitive at present, virtually everyone agrees that adequate vitamin D status is a good thing.

My recommendations are to:

  • Get as much vitamin D as possible from vitamin D-fortified foods, oily fish, and sensible sun exposure.
  • Get your serum 25(OH)D level determined and take vitamin D supplements if it is low.

The Bottom Line

A recent study of vitamin D status in Finnish children ages 6-8 found:

  • Higher vitamin D status was associated with lower plasma levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides.
  • The association between better vitamin D status and lower blood levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol remained after correcting for weight, physical activity, sedentary behavior, diet, daylight time, parental education, and genetic mutations known to affect vitamin D metabolism.

This study is another indication that optimal vitamin D status may be important for heart health, even in young children. While the correlation between vitamin D status and heart health is not definitive at present, virtually everyone agrees that adequate vitamin D status is a good thing.

My recommendations are to:

  • Get as much vitamin D as possible from vitamin D-fortified foods, oily fish, and sensible sun exposure.
  • Get your serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level determined and take vitamin D supplements if it is low.
  • Make sure your children are getting enough vitamin D in their diet and have optimal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D.

For more details, read the article above.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Health Tips From The Professor Why Is Fructose Bad For You?

Posted July 31, 2018 by Dr. Steve Chaney

Is It The Sugar, Or Is It The Food?

Author: Dr. Stephen Chaney

 

why fructose bad for youI don’t usually report on studies done in mice, but this study sheds light on a particularly puzzling question: Why is fructose bad for you?

The studies are clear-cut. High fructose consumption is associated with inflammation, obesity, non-alcoholic liver disease, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, kidney disease, increased LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, and heart disease. Based on these associations, fructose appears to be deadly. Why would anyone want to consume it?

Yet fructose is found in virtually every fruit. In fact, fructose, also known as fruit sugar, was first isolated from fruits. Hence the name fructose. Humans have been eating fruits safely for thousands of years. Fruits are very good for us. That raises the question: “If fruits are good for us, how can fructose be bad for us?”.

An important clue can be found by looking at what the food industry has done to the American diet. Because fructose imparts a pleasurable, sweet taste to foods, the food industry keeps adding it to more and more foods. As a result, dietary intake of fructose has increased 100-fold over the past two centuries. It has reached the point where fructose now accounts for almost 10% of the caloric intake in the United States.

 

Is It The Sugar, Or Is It The Food?

 

Let me expand the discussion by using a couple of graphics I developed for my book, “Slaying The Food Myths.”  

There Are No Sugar Villains. There Are No Sugar Heroes:

why fructose bad for you sugar foodVirtually all sweeteners are primarily a mixture of fructose and glucose. The graphic on the left compares high fructose corn syrup (the current villain) with other “natural” sweeteners used in foods (our current heroes). High fructose corn syrup ranges from about 40% fructose to 55% fructose. The exact percentage depends on what kind of food product is being made with it. Honey and coconut sugar are about 45% fructose. Sucrose and grape juice concentrate are around 50% fructose. Apple juice concentrate is around 60% fructose, and agave sugar comes in at a whopping 80% fructose.

In other words, if fructose is the culprit that everyone makes it out to be, “healthy” sugars are no better than high fructose corn syrup. Simply substituting a “healthy” sugar for high fructose corn syrup is unlikely to provide any meaningful benefit.

 

Is It The Sugar, Or Is The Food?

why fructose bad for you fruitsThis graphic shows us what a nutrition label would look like on a medium apple. I am sure that label is a wake-up call for many of you. The amount of sugar and the percentage of fructose and glucose are about the same as in an 8-ounce soda sweetened with high fructose corn syrup. The same is true for virtually every other fruit you can think of.

Now let me share one more thing you won’t hear from what I refer to as “Dr. Strangelove’s Health Blog” (You probably know the ones I am referring to). Virtually all the studies showing the bad effects of fructose consumption have been done with sodas and sugary junk foods. They haven’t been done with apples.

In fact, virtually every study looking at fruit and vegetable consumption has shown they are incredibly good for us. They lower inflammation and reduce the risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. And, the more the better. One study found that the health benefits of fruit and vegetable consumption topped out at around 10 servings a day.

With this background, you should now fully understand why the question “If fruits are good for us, how can fructose be bad for us?” is so perplexing.

My simplistic explanation has always been that whole foods like fruits have fiber, which slows the absorption of fructose from the intestine. Our bodies were designed to handle fructose in a safe manner when it enters the bloodstream slowly. Sodas and junk foods, on the other hand, have little to slow the absorption of fructose. When fructose enters the bloodstream rapidly, our “safe” metabolic pathways for handling it are overwhelmed, and it is forced into the pathways that are harmful. For example, the “excess” fructose is converted to fat by the liver, which causes inflammation, obesity, fatty liver disease, and triglyceride production.

This is, of course, simply my hypothesis for explaining the different effect of fructose in fruits and sodas. It is based on sound metabolic principles, but it is far from proven. That is why I found the current study (C. Jang et al, Cell Metabolism, 27: 351-361, 2018 ) so interesting. It provides a metabolic rationale for my hypothesis.

How Was The Study Done?

Mice were fed a 1:1 mixture of fructose and glucose at doses that approximated the ranges of typical human fructose consumption. The fructose was isotopically labeled so that fructose and its metabolites could be identified by LC-MS (liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry). After feeding the mice the labeled fructose, the investigator measured the amount of fructose and its metabolites in various organs and in the portal vein, which transports sugars from the intestine to the liver for additional metabolism before they enter the bloodstream.

 

Why Is Fructose Bad For You?

why fructose bad for you intestine liverThe first surprise was that most of the fructose was metabolized by the intestinal mucosal cells that line the small intestine rather than the liver. Previous reports had assumed that fructose was primarily metabolized by the liver because that was where most of the bad effects of fructose metabolism had been observed.

These investigators observed that fructose was primarily converted to glucose and small molecular weight metabolites by the intestinal mucosal cells before being released into the portal vein, where they were transported to the liver. However, there was a strong dose response effect.

  • At low fructose doses, 90% of fructose was metabolized by intestinal mucosal cells before being released to the liver.
  • At high fructose doses, only 70% of fructose was metabolized by intestinal mucosal cells.
  • That means at high fructose doses the amount of fructose reaching the liver unchanged increases from 10% to 30%. That is a 3-fold increase!

The authors concluded:

  • “Based on these findings, we propose that the small intestine shields the liver from fructose and that excessive doses of fructose overwhelm the small intestine, spilling over to the liver where they cause toxicity.”
  • “A key difference between the health effects of fiber-rich fruits (and perhaps even fiber-rich prepared foods) and juices/sodas is their rate of intestinal fructose release.”
  • “It is likely that the appearance rate of free fructose in the small intestine plays a critical role in dictating its metabolic fate. Like the lower doses in our experiments, a slower rate of fructose appearance will result in more complete intestinal clearance, whereas higher doses and faster rates result in fructose overflow to the liver.”

This study needs to be confirmed, and the mechanism may be entirely different in humans. However, whether the mechanism is the same in mice and humans is immaterial. We already know that fructose in sodas and junk foods exerts a very different effect on our health than fructose in fruits and other fiber-containing foods.

The Bottom Line

 

Previous studies have clearly shown that fructose in sodas and junk foods is bad for us, while fructose in fruits is good for us. A recent study in mice provides a metabolic explanation for this difference. The study found:

  • At low fructose doses, 90% of fructose was metabolized by intestinal mucosal cells before being released to the liver.
  • At high fructose doses, only 70% of fructose was metabolized by intestinal mucosal cells.
  • That means at high fructose doses the amount of fructose reaching the liver unchanged increases from 10% to 30%. That is a 3-fold increase!

The authors concluded:

  • “Based on these findings, we propose that the small intestine shields the liver from fructose and that excessive doses of fructose overwhelm the small intestine, spilling over to the liver where they cause toxicity.”
  • “A key difference between the health effects of fiber-rich fruits (and perhaps even fiber-rich prepared foods) and juices/sodas is their rate of intestinal fructose release.”
  • “It is likely that the appearance rate of free fructose in the small intestine plays a critical role in dictating its metabolic fate. Like the lower doses in our experiments, a slower rate of fructose appearance will result in more complete intestinal clearance, whereas higher doses and faster rates result in fructose overflow to the liver.”

This study needs to be confirmed, and the mechanism may be entirely different in humans. However, whether the mechanism is the same in mice and humans is immaterial. We already know that fructose in sodas and junk foods exerts a very different effect on our health than fructose in fruits and other fiber-containing foods.

For more details, read the article above.

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

 

Desert Safari – the Theme

The rich wildlife will increase the charm. Whatever the situation, there’s an overnight safari to pleasure from the wildlife in of the desert.

Well, a trip to the Dubai Heritage Village provides you a concise look into the life span of Dubai of olden days. There are a lot more attractions of Dubai. Desert Safari Dubai is one of the most astounding activities in UAE.

Rajasthan is the paradise for those tigers and several other endangered species. While in Bali that you cannot just benefit from the pristine elegance of its own beaches but you might also stop by the innumerable Hindu Temples. If you would like to devote your day outdoors but need to stay safe from the warmth, visiting one of the many water parks in Dubai is an excellent idea.

 

So you don’t get lost in the desert and are in a position to enjoy all the characteristics as well as the places throughout the experience. There’s no other experience that’s worth having other than researching the massive desert of UAE. In case you want a go in trekking, there’s the popular climbing Safari that could supply you a taste of good states.

 

It has some of the best water parks that you have ever seen everywhere. It’s a very popular holiday destination of the world. It isn’t just about modern buildings and skyscrapers, in addition, it has a superb heritage on display.

UAE travel provides many organic characteristics that lead to an intriguing visit. A road goes all of the way to the Palomar Observatory parking lot and it’s totally free to see the gigantic telescopes. You can also discover a palm island.

The price per person for each tour fluctuates based on the sort of package you select and the variety of people aboard. Before you begin your visit, its important that you find about all the info that will make it possible for you to understand more about just what the place has a offer.

 

Book The Tour Wisely you may pick from quite a few deals to really have a Desert Internet explorer. There are loads of yachts which could be selected in line with the wants and budget of the tourists. Thus there’s a need of a unique 4×4 wheeled vehicle.

So you don’t get lost in the desert and so are in a position to enjoy all the qualities and the places during the adventure. Whatever you would love from the desert that is necessary will be supplied by us. It looks beautiful in the day under the sun.

The Ultimate Emirates Desert Safari Offers Trick

There are several different heritage hotels where you are able to experience the Victorian age when enjoying current day comfort. Dubai Desert safari is the best location for selfies, a lovely spot for kids, or it could be an amazing trip for the very long family trip. Even if you’re visiting Australia for an important business meeting, you’re guaranteed to arrive at the office before time.

Airfare sales you might be lucky in receiving the least expensive business flights throughout airfare sales. No, it’s not simply about the resort booking that’s being known here.

Desert safari is the detailed bundle for pretty much any explorer. So you are going to get unique desert safari encounter you’ll continue to keep your great memories.

If you’re considering something more interesting from the desert, then there are a lot of alternatives to consider. Just about all important brands are here and you are certainly going to adore the purchasing experience here. There are many activities which are either free or relatively cheap.

Become self-evident with a Free Psychic Reading By utilizing an entirely free psychic reading you’re not only trying out the psychic but you’re trying out the whole online psychic reading procedure. There’s no cost to see the observatory and have a look at their mathematics exhibits. There’s a quote “free advice is well worth the price “so if you’ve got such skill, so one needs to offer their talent publicly.

In the previous decades, the Brisbane festival was morphed into some kind of a wonderland. Ski Dubai is the best ski resort on Earth. When the tour is reserved, you are likely to be picked up right from the location where you are staying.

When it is shopping, trade, business deal or skiing pleasure which you’ve begun to do this, there are a couple adventures which you wouldn’t provide a miss. The entire journey is quite secured and protected so that you don’t have to be concerned on that front. Himalayas, the mightiest mountain scope of the world is the best for trekking.

Want to Know More About Emirates Desert Safari Offers?

Desert is certainly an extremely attractive point for those people and the Emirates desert safari offers is extremely much secure as well and also the climate is significantly stable and it’s the ideal desert to go to. A mixture of supper in desert and safari can wind up being ideal to improve your experience. Anyhow, there’s an overnight safari to delight in the wildlife in of the desert.

It’s an unbelievable city with magnificent buildings, desert and ultra-modern artifacts that has changed into a big tourist destination for all the visitors. Get in contact with us if you’re visiting Dubai or other emirate in the UAE for desert safari and we’re going to be certain that you get the very best and the most thrilling desert experience.

It is possible for you to value camel safari to analyze the desert and recognize that the glistening sand ridges of Rajasthan. The nighttime safari gives you the ability to experience Sunset in the desert also referred to as Sunset view point. After waking up early to grab the mesmerising sunset daily, you will have a couple excursions to take into consideration.

You can pick the package depending upon your interest in accordance with activities and time you’ve got in hand. The very first thing you need to do is to learn a few choices that are supplied for you.

For you to overcome the cold, you would likewise become remarkable drinks which include items like tea, alcohol, mocktails, sandwiches, in addition to a choice of warm clothes. A massive selection on the menus using a huge variety of Argentinean beverages is coupled with live audio to finish the experience. You can pick from a broad selection of tour packages in accordance with your interest, preference, and price range.

How to Choose Emirates Desert Safari Offers

If you search the ideal tourist destination, Dubai city tour deal is the most suitable alternative for you. It’s one of the most.

The meal of Dubai is extremely delectable. You are able to surely receive magical moments on your visit to Dubai because you indulge in numerous pursuits and see the key landmarks of Dubai. You are going to receive the perfect time in the hills of Dubai at quite affordable and affordable prices.